A literary analysis of the love song of j alfred prufrock

It is a variation on the dramatic monologue, a type of writing which was very popular from around to Instead, he reminiscences over lost youth and dwells on his inadequacies, which cause him to lose faith in himself in the same way he is losing faith in society as a whole. It could no longer stand comfortably on its old post-Romantic ground, ecstatic before the natural world.

So, for example, loose iambic pentameter, tetrameter and trimeter pop up now and again to help keep the poem on track as it heads out into the yellow fog of the cityscape.

Alfred Prufrock Dramatic Monologue: These rhymes certainly give the sense of song and bring a lyrical feel to the poem. Arms that lie along a table, or wrap about a shawl. Smoothed by long fingers, Asleep … tired … or it malingers, Stretched on the floor, here beside you and me.

Much like the cat, Prufrock is on the outside looking in at a world that has not been prepared for him.

The Love Song of J. Alfred Prufrock by T.S. Eliot

This is why the poem is so significantly argued over: There is no way to distinguish between actual movement and imaginary movement. David Spurr wrote, on these lines in particular: This lingering doubt that others place on his shoulders weigh heavy on Prufrock.

Eliot, can be summed up in a contemporary review published in The Times Literary Supplement, on the 21st of June The city is half-deserted. Alfred Prufrock, like much of T.

He is insecure, lonely and loveless. The poem seems to be steeped in allusions, which lends an air of authority to J. Alfred Prufrock is a respectable character but has seen the seedier side of life. And I have known the arms already, known them all— Arms that are braceleted and white and bare But in the lamplight, downed with light brown hair!

He convinces himself not to act on what he wants — which, presumably, is to go to the party — but to remain steadfast and distant, looking into a world that he is not part of.

Many of the references made in The Love Song of J. He could be anywhere, we are not told where he is. Would it have been worth while If one, settling a pillow or throwing off a shawl, And turning toward the window, should say: But who can blame him?

It could certainly be seen as another idea to the you-I schism. Prufrock is in a life or death situation, between heaven and hell. Prufrock is caught between his own dismal introspection and the longing for a companion who is part of the problem. It is just the trauma of voicing aloud these thoughts that is stopping him.

Streets that follow like a tedious argument Of insidious intent To lead you to an overwhelming question As a naturalized British citizen who was born and raised in the southern United States, he worked as an editor and laid the foundation for what was to be known as New Criticism, a literary model widely utilized by universities across English-speaking nations at the time.

The speaker and protagonist describes a series of events, inadvertently showing aspects of his or her inner life. World War 1 was on the horizon and the struggles for power were beginning to alter the way people lived and thought and loved.A Refreshing Analysis of T.S.

Eliot's "The Love Song of J. Alfred Prufrock" Justin J.R.K. Kirkey The Love Song of J.

Analysis of Poem:

Alfred Prufrock. To say that "The Love Song of J. Alfred Prufrock" is a typical romantic ode to the wonders of love, as the title may suggest, is quite far from the truth. Ask each student to access the Prufrock Analysis Worksheet they completed while reading “The Love Song of J. Alfred Prufrock” prior to this class period.

Alternatively, pass out the Prufrock Analysis Worksheet and ask them to re-read the poem carefully and answer the questions, either individually or in groups.

As is so often true in literary analysis, the themes, characters, and allusions of “The Love Song of J. Alfred Prufrock” shine through the particular passages (Read more on Quotes in "The.

Literary Devices in The Love Song of J. Alfred Prufrock Dramatic Monologue: A dramatic monologue is a psychologically revealing character study written from the first-person perspective.

The speaker and protagonist describes a series of events, inadvertently showing aspects of his or her inner life. Modernist Disillusionment in “The Love Song of J. Alfred Prufrock” Unlike the romantic period that preceded it, the modernist literary movement reflected the feelings of a Lost Generation affected by industrialization and war trauma.

The Love Song of J. Alfred Prufrock Questions and Answers. The Question and Answer section for The Love Song of J. Alfred Prufrock is a great resource to ask questions, find answers, and discuss the novel.

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A literary analysis of the love song of j alfred prufrock
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